Cross Record

US Tour dates and new music video from Cross Record

Back in January, Cross Record released their latest record, Wabi-Sabi. The record was exquisitely constructed but simultaneously pock-marked with raw, abstract beauty. One of the raw, abstract beauties is the track, “Lemon”, for which Cross Record recently released the music video for. The track is centered upon the process of a fruit, like a lemon, withering, wrinkling and drying up in the sun. The music video, directed by Andrew McGlennon, conveys this same process but likens it to the wrinkles on an old gentleman’s face.

 

Cross Record will kick off their spring tour near the end of April. For MFL’s review of Wabi-Sabi and all Wabi-Sabi-related information, go here!

Cross Record Tour Dates
Tue. April 26 – Lawrence, KS @ Love Garden Records
Wed. April 27 – St. Louis, MO @ Heavy Anchor w/Baby Baby Dance With Me and Accelerando
Sat. April 30 – Chicago, IL @ Schubas
Mon. May 2 – Minneapolis, MN @ 7th St. Entry
Tue. May 3 – Iowa City, IA @ Trumpet Blossom
Thu. May 5 – Omaha, NE @ O’Leavers w/Simon Joyner and David Nance
Sat. May 7 – Fort Collins, CO @ The Wolverine Farms Letterpress and Publick House
Wed. May 10 – Portland, OR @ Analog Café w/ C^ves
Wed. May 11 – Seattle, WA @ Vera Project
Fri. May 13 – San Francisco, CA @ Hemlock Tavern
Sun. May 15 – Los Angeles, CA @ Bootleg w/Eagle Rock Gospel Singers
Wed. May 18 – Albuquerque, NM @ Ocotillo Room
Fri. May 20 – 3TEN ACL Live

Album Review: “Wabi-Sabi” by Cross Record

Emily Cross introduces her latest project, pulling apart the curtains shrouding the entrance into her world of music. The entrance is big, beautiful and full of brass: “The Curtains Part” is a loud introduction to the world that is Wabi-Sabi. The sharp contrast between Cross’s soft voice and the flickering strums on a guitar and the swelling brass at the end create a perfect first handshake with Wabi-Sabi.

Emily Cross extracted herself from her life in Chicago and engrafted it all in a new, very different place: Dripping Springs, TX. Here, her and her husband lived on a ranch with their chickens and a bird sanctuary in their back yard. Cross worked upwards of 60 hours a week as a nanny, restaurant worker, among other jobs. In the midst of all this, she channeled what energy she had left; energy that came with this new experience, new location and the buzz of her new life. Together this energy was projected in song. The inspiration for the album comes from the Japanese term, “wabi-sabi”, which is the idea of impermanence and imperfection. In Cross’s new home, she was surrounded by the unfamiliar, mysterious and beautiful. You can hear the foggy mornings and bright sunrises, singing birds and peaceful sunsets of the ranch in her music.

“Two Rings” is one of my favorites. The xylophone and bells are the sound of curiosity and exploration. I envision hands pulling back branches and bare feet wandering through trees and brush. The song gains and keeps momentum, speeding from walk to run.

 

 

Then comes “Steady Waves”, one of a few singles released to give listeners a taste of Wabi-Sabi. This single is a potent example of what this record has to offer. Intensity waxes and wanes, volume builds and crashes like waves. There is a drive behind this song like a quickly beating heart that is spellbinding and engrossing. It is almost as if you are being chased. But, near the end of the song, the chase slows to a gentle rocking, a lullaby. Cross casts these mystical spells on the listener time and time again during Wabi-Sabi.

 

“High Rise”, directly inspired by the rising of the sun above their very own Moon Phase Ranch, depicts in song the rising of an orange sun. With this track comes a curious music video in which Cross contorts, writhes and interacts with a chainsaw whilst wearing a strange, outfit causing her to look almost alien. From here “High Rise” breathes life into the following track, “Something Unseen Touches a Flower to My Forehead.” It is a forceful, pounding track with Cross’s voice gently laid atop. A light, delicate voice above rough guitars, throbbing drums and a sound like whips. The juxtaposition is invigorating and refreshing.

 

 

Her music glows, glimmers and shines but can also be raw, rough, jagged and forceful. Here lies the true beauty of Wabi-Sabi. The beauty in disparity and adaptation in divergent environments can be glimmering, exciting and striking but simultaneously rough, raw and jagged.

 

“Basket” for example is a strange, unnerving and otherworldly track that unpredictably, describes parenting in relation to weaving a basket. Over and over again, like the motions of weaving a basket, with ringing in the background and plucks on strings Cross sings:

 

I wanted to make something to hold you in.

I gathered the grasses, the sun turned them golden.

 

The brooding track, “Wasp in a Jar”, showcases Cross’ capabilities as a creative and diverse songwriter and displays the jagged edge of Wabi-Sabi. To me, it sticks out as one of the only, maybe THE only indie-rock-inspired track. It nearly has an edge of grunge rock as well. It’s wonderful to get the penultimate track on an album and be completely surprised at what hits your ears. You cannot predict Emily Cross’ next move sonically.

 

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Photo Credit: Bryan C. Parker

You can discover Wabi-Sabi for yourself as it’s out now on Ba Da Bing Records. You can purchase it on iTunes.

Stream Cross Record’s new record NOW

Emily Cross, brain child, nurturer and creative force behind the musical project, Cross Record, is letting the public’s ears enjoy her sophomore record from start to finish right now. Everyone can have and hold Wabi-Sabi this Friday, January 29th as its’ due out officially on Ba Da Bing Records.

Wabi-Sabi is a record of complexity, encompassing every topic from parenting to the peace of waking up to the thick fog that surrounded her and her husband’s ranch home in Dripping Springs, TX.

For an appetizer, enjoy the newly released music video for her eerie track, “Basket.”

 

Stream below via Line of Best Fit:

http://www.thelineofbestfit.com/new-music/discoveryalbum-stream/cross-record-wabi-sabi

 

Striking new single from Cross Record: “Basket”

Emily Cross has already stunned us with her moving, deeply creative understanding and interpretation of music with the release of “Steady Waves” and “High Rise”, which came with an incredible video. Now, she unveils a more eerie, abstract side of her musical abilities. The newly released track “Basket” is dissonant with a looming sense of anxiety. Cross’s soft voice trickles down and echoes across the constant buzzing, ringing and tapping instrumentals. According to Cross, the track describes parenthood through the process of creating a basket. Hear it for yourself:

 

 

“Basket” is off of Cross Record’s upcoming record, Wabi-Sabi, which is due out January 29th on Ba Da Bing Records.

Featured image photo credit: Brian Parker

First single off of Cross Record’s sophomore album: “Steady Waves”

Cross Record is the project of husband and wife Dan Duszynski and Emily Cross. “Steady Waves” and all of the accompanying tracks on their upcoming sophomore album, Wabi-Sabi were written and recorded at the couple’s ranch called, Moon Phase Ranch in Dripping Springs, TX. This ranch was not their home before, though. Emily and Dan dropped their Chicago life to live on 18 acres of land that included a bird sanctuary. There in Dripping Springs, Emily some how found the time to create Wabi-Sabi despite the 60 work week which included a smattering of jobs from restaurant work to nannying. Her husband, Dan, produced the record along with the couple’s friend Theo Karon and Thor Harris of Swans. If the rest of the record is anything like “Steady Waves”, it’s sure to be incredible.

“Steady Waves” is a surprisingly powerful track and a boldly beautiful introduction to Cross Record’s new work. It certainly takes the listener somewhere that is not predicted initially. Listen:

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Wabi-Sabi in its entirety is due out on January 29th on Ba Da Bing Records and you can pre-order it here. If you’re intrigued by Cross Record, as am I, you can learn more about them by watching their documentary, “Hardly Sound”:

http://video.klru.tv/viralplayer/2365340636/